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My Cookie Books!

Baking with Cookie Molds
Secrets and Recipes for Making Amazing Handcrafted Cookies

 

 

Cookie Molds Around the Year

An Almanac of Molds, Cookies, and Other Treats for Christmas, New Year’s, Valentine’s Day, Easter, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Other Holidays, and Every Season

 

Around the Year with Cookie Molds

January

New Year's, Twelfth Night, and Storytelling around the Fire

 

 

January Issue Contents

January--New Years, Twelfth Night, and Storytelling around the Fire
New Year's Cookies (Cookies to Serve with Champagne)
Tip: Molding Shortbread
Story: Journey to the Twelfth Night Market
Recipe: King Cookies (Spiced Lemon Pecan Cookies)
Story: The White Cat
Tip: Matching Cookies and Molds
Story: The Princess Mouse, A Tale of Finland
Recipe: Princess Mouse’s Layered Finnish Cookies
Tip: Adapting Recipes
Recipe: Mikko’s Rauma (Finnish Spice Cookies)
Tip: Removing Extra Flour from Molded Cookies
Story: The Ropedancer
Tip: Allover Pattern Rolling Pin

Story: King o’ the Cats
Recipe: Chocolate-Coconut Tea Cookies as served in Tabby-on-Thames
Story: The Sea King’s Daughter
Recipe: Pryaniki for the Sea King’s Feast (Plum Gingerbread Tarts)
Recipe: Lime Cookies for a January Birthday
Tip: Making Irregular-Shaped Cookies as Sandwich Cookies
January Cookie Molds

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January--New Year's, Twelfth Night, and Storytelling around the Fire

For most of the years I've lived in the Northwest, December has been the coldest, stormiest month. I tend to regard January as the beginning of the path to spring. However, it can still be very cold, and the days are still short. At the 49th Parallel, darkness comes early on a January evening.

The month begins with a feast, celebrating new beginnings and good intentions. Next, we celebrate the Feast of the Three Kings on January 6. This is Twelfth Night, the "twelfth day of Christmas," and a now little-observed tradition is that Christmas decorations should be removed on that day, and not before.

After that, the holidays are over, the Christmas lights no longer sparkle. But we have a new light--or an old one, for it goes back farther than history--storytelling around the fire. Or, in our case, the fireplace.

And stories are a form of light in themselves, because they call on the light of the imagination. They truly enlighten us--tell us who we are, and who we can be. Stories are one of the great powers in human history. The power of stories may be the source of the belief in magic.

And no time is more magical than the gathering of faces around the fire, and the first words of a story that binds them together. So join me for an evening of stories and cookies.

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New Year's Cookies

Lemon Shortbread Cookie Tarts to Serve with Champagne and Strawberries

1 cup (225 grams) unsalted butter , softened
1⁄2 cup (100 grams) sugar
1 tablespoon honey
1 teaspoon freshly-squeezed lemon juice
1 teaspoon finely-grated lemon peel
1/8 teaspoon culinary lemon oil
About 2 1⁄2 cups (350 grams) all-purpose flour (plain flour)
Lemon curd
Strawberries


1. Cream the butter, sugar, and honey.
2. Combine the lemon juice, lemon peel, and lemon oil and add to the butter mixture.
3. Add all-purpose flour slowly until the mixture is solid enough to knead.
4. Transfer to your work surface and knead in all but the last 1⁄4 cup (35 grams) of all-purpose flour.
5. Add up to the remaining 1⁄4 cup (35 grams) of all-purpose flour slowly and carefully, checking the texture of your dough as you go. Stop adding when the dough is still tacky but no longer sticks to your work surface.
6. When the flour amount seems right, wrap and set aside. Do not chill before molding.
7. I recommend molding and baking a test cookie to make sure your dough is correct. If you haven't added enough flour, the cookies won't hold an impression.
8. Preheat the oven to 300°F (150°C).
9. Bake the test cookie for 10 to 15 minutes or until the edges have slightly browned and the top has begun to firm up.
10. Examine the test cookie. If it has spread during baking and the design has become blurry, knead a little more flour into the rest of the dough and repeat the test.
11. When you have good results from the test, refrigerate the rest of the dough for up to 1⁄2 hour—until it’s firm but still flexible—then form and bake the rest of the cookies as instructed above.
12. Cool the cookies and spread the center of each thinly with lemon curd. Serve the berries alongside the cookies or top each cookie tart with a thin slice of strawberry.

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Tip: Molding Shortbread

For most of my recipes, I've found that chilling before molding makes very little difference, maybe none. But for shortbread, there's a simple rule: don't chill before molding, period.

Here's what happens when you bake a cookie: The butterfat melts. The sugar melts. The flour and water have combined during mixing, and they become a solid structure. So do eggs, if any.

In shortbread, the water content of the butter combines with the flour to provide the structure. But the butterfat and sugar content is so high that the cookie will run if the dough was stiff enough to mold because the butterfat was chilled. You must add enough flour to make a molding consistency at room temperature.

If your cookies are small, as these cookie tarts are, you can make the cookies tenderer by using pastry flour, half cake flour and half all-purpose, or US Southern all-purpose flour such as White Lily. However, if you use a soft flour with a too-large cookie mold, the cookies will crack.

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Story—Journey to the Twelfth-Night Market

By Anne L. Watson

In a town not far from you, there lived a farmer who was a miserable man. His farm was prosperous, but...

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Recipe: King Cookies (Spiced Lemon Pecan Cookies)

 

These cookies are based on “King Cake,” the traditional Twelfth Night dessert in New Orleans, where I grew up. Traditionally, a bean, coin, or favor is placed in the cake , and the person whose piece of cake includes the favor must host the king cake party the next year.

To make as a layered cookie, chop the pecans finely and add to the lower layer. For layered cookie directions, see the November issue of this magazine, or my book Baking with Cookie Molds. Otherwise, grind the pecans in a food processor with one cup of the flour.

1 cup (225 grams) unsalted butter
1 large egg
1⁄2 cup (120 milliliters) honey
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 teaspoon natural lemon flavoring
1⁄2 cup (100 grams) sugar
2 teaspoons finely grated lemon peel
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1⁄8 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup (80 grams) chopped pecans
About 4 1⁄2 cups (630 grams) all-purpose flour (plain flour)

1. Unless you're making a layered cookie, grind the pecans with one cup of the flour and set aside. (See note)
2. Melt the butter and set aside.
3. Beat the egg in a large bowl until the yolk and white are fully mixed.
4. Mix the honey, lemon juice, and lemon flavoring. Add to the egg and beat until well mixed.
5. Mix the sugar, grated lemon peel, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt. Add to the egg mixture and beat until well mixed.
6. Add the melted butter slowly and beat until well mixed. Don’t just pour it in quickly—the heat still in the butter could cook the egg!
If you've ground the pecans with part of the flour, add that first.
8. Transfer the dough to a floured work surface. Continue adding flour by kneading in a little at a time until the dough is smooth and slightly sticky.
9. Wrap or cover the dough to prevent drying, then refrigerate to make it less sticky. This should take half an hour at most.
10. Roll and form the dough according to the directions for cookie tarts.
11. Refrigerate the cookies while you preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175oC), or lower for especially thick cookies.
12. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes or until the edges have slightly browned and the top has begun to firm up.

Note

Chopped pecans won't look good on the surface of molded cookies, so you should either grind the pecans or make the cookies as layered cookies per the instructions in my book Baking with Cookie Molds. If you grind the pecans, combine them with one cup of the flour in a food processor with the steel blade and process until smooth. The reason from processing them with flour is to prevent them from being turned into nut butter, which will happen otherwise.

 

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Story: The White Cat

by Anne L. Watson

In a town not far from you, there lived an old grazier who owned many acres and a fine flock of sheep. He was not a bad man, not at all. But he had an enemy...

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Tip: Matching Cookies and Molds

When you make molded cookies, it's important to think about the match between your recipe and the mold you want to use.

Cookie recipes make dough that varies in color, texture, and "pattern"--that is, whether it has speckles of color. It also varies in how tender the cookie is after it's cooked.

Making sure you have a good match between the cookie and the mold is one of many reasons why it's a good idea to bake a test cookie.

Color:

The things that add color to dough are fairly obvious--chocolate, cocoa, coffee, spices, etc. Almost all are strong flavors, and you want them for that. But, if you use them in your dough, you have to choose a cookie mold that isn't too small or delicate in pattern. A larger, more deeply cut cookie mold will give you a prettier cookie with a dark dough. One thing to realize, though, is that the dough is going to be darker than the baked cookie, because quite a bit of liquid bakes out of the cookie.

Texture:

Some ingredients like chocolate chips, chopped nuts, dried fruit, or oatmeal, just don't marry well with cookie molds. You need a smooth, dense surface to print the pattern of a mold. If you want these ingredients, you can make layered cookies, as I describe in my book, Baking with Cookie Molds. Or you can make sandwich cookies or cookie tarts with the special ingredients in the filling. Or you can grind nuts replace part of the flour with them. If you use dried fruit, even in layered cookies, it must be chopped much finer than you'd expect, because it will re-hydrate and enlarge once it gets into the dough. Of course, you might re-hydrate it with brandy or other flavoring before you put it into the dough, then chop it. I haven't tried this, but it would probably work, with a little experimentation.

Pattern:

Some ingredients like maple sugar or spices may make speckles in the dough. This works fine with some molds, not with others. A flower with dark speckles is likely to look as if it has Black Spot. Faces might look strange. But geometric patterns or animals won't seem odd with speckles. This is also a matter of scale--a large speckled figure might look fine, where a close-up of a face might not.

Tenderness:

The more tender a cookie is, the smaller it must be to hold together. Tenderness is affected by the kind of flour you use--softer flours such as cake flour, pastry flour, or Southern US all-purpose flour, will make tenderer cookies. Butter and sugar proportions also affect tenderness. So does use of honey--when I make enormous cookies, I use 100% honey rather than half sugar and half honey. They're harder and denser than all-sugar cookies.

Handling also affects tenderness. The more you knead dough, the tougher it will be.

I always make shortbread with soft flour, and I use tiny molds. For most other cookies, there's a wider range. Most molds can tolerate a variety of color, texture, and pattern.

I wouldn't use extra soft flour for any cookie over an inch or so in any dimension. For those over eight inches, I'd use 100% honey. I'm not saying it couldn't work to break those rules, but I like to make things easy on myself.

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Story: The Princess Mouse, a Tale of Finland

Story—The Princess Mouse, a Tale of Finland

My husband, Aaron Shepard, is a children’s author who re-tells folktales of many countries. This story from Finland is about a young man named Mikko who finds his bride in an unusual way. And the bride he finds is an unusual bride.

Click on the book cover to read the story on Aaron’s web site.


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Recipe: Princess Mouse’s Layered Finnish Cookies

This isn’t a traditional cookie recipe from Finland. Instead, I've used the flavors of Pasha, a Finnish dessert usually served at Easter. Since raisins are traditional in this dessert, we'll make the cookies in layers, with raisins in the lower layer.

The cookie is mild flavored, somewhat similar to a Garibaldi. If you want a stronger flavor, increase the spices and flavorings and add finely grated orange rind to the lower layer along with the raisins.

1 cup (225 grams) unsalted butter
1 large egg
1⁄2 cup (120 milliliters) honey
1 tablespoon cream
1 teaspoon natural lemon flavoring
1⁄2 teaspoon natural orange flavoring
1/4 teaspoon almond extract
1⁄2 cup (100 grams) sugar
1/2 cup (80 grams) ground blanched almonds--see note
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger (or 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger)
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1⁄4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup (75 grams) chopped raisins

About 3 3/4 cups (515 grams) all-purpose flour (plain flour)

1. Melt the butter and set aside.
2. Beat the egg in a large bowl until yolk and white are fully mixed.
3. Mix the honey, cream, lemon flavoring, orange flavoring, and almond extract. Add to the egg and beat until well mixed. If you're using fresh ginger, add it to this mixture.
4. Mix the sugar, ground almonds, ground ginger, cloves, cinnamon, and salt. Add to the egg mixture and beat until well mixed.
5. Add the melted butter slowly and beat until well mixed.
6. Add flour slowly until the mixture is solid enough to knead.
7. Transfer to your work surface and knead in more flour to make a soft, slightly sticky dough.
8. Form cookies according to directions for layered cookies in my book, Baking with Cookie Molds.
12. Refrigerate the cookies while you preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C), or lower for especially thick cookies.
11. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes or until the edges have slightly browned and the top has begun to firm up, longer for extra-large cookies.

Note

Blanched almonds are almonds with the brown skins removed. It’s not necessary to blanch them, but your cookies will be quite speckled if you don’t. You may be able to find them already ground, or you can mix the almonds with one cup of the flour and process in a food processor with the steel blade. The flour keeps the almonds from turning into almond butter in the processor. If you grind the almonds with part of the flour, add right after you add the butter, and before the rest of the flour.

If you want to blanch your own almonds, it’s easy but a bit messy. Here’s a link to instructions for blanching almonds

To chop raisins, sprinkle a little flour on them. This will keep them from sticking to your knife. I've tried chopping them in a food processor, but even with the flour, a knife does a better job.

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Tip: Adapting Recipes

You can adapt molded cookie recipes to recall the flavor of any national cuisine, as I did with Princess Mouse’s Layered Finnish Cookies. Look up recipes for desserts and sweets from a particular nation or culture, and notice the spices, variations of sugar, and other prominent flavors such as nuts, raisins, citrus, or chocolate. Then take a simple molded cookie recipe and add those flavors.

Of course, your flavors don’t have to have a national theme. You could choose flavors that you simply like together. One book that I highly recommend for choosing flavors is The Flavor Bible: The Essential Guide to Culinary Creativity, Based on the Wisdom of America's Most Imaginative Chefs, by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg. I’ve used it with great success.

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Recipe: Mikko’s Rauma (Finnish Spice Cookies)

The flavor is somewhere between snickerdoodles and graham crackers. Because of the graham flour, this dough is more inclined to stick to molds than most. Flour the rolled out dough more heavily than most, and see the tip below for removing any stray bits of flour from molded dough.

If you have difficulty getting a smooth surface for molding, brush a little flour on the dough and roll it in. Then flour again and mold the cookies.

1 cup (225 grams) unsalted butter
1 large egg
1⁄2 cup (120 milliliters) honey
1 tablespoon cream
1 teaspoon brandy flavoring
1⁄2 cup (100 grams) dark brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground mace
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1⁄8 teaspoon ground cardamom
1⁄4 teaspoon salt
1 cup (120 grams) graham flour or whole wheat flour
About 4 1⁄2 cups (630 grams) all-purpose flour (plain flour)

1. Melt the butter and set aside.
2. Beat the egg in a large bowl until yolk and white are fully mixed.
3. Mix the honey, cream, and brandy flavoring. Add to the egg and beat until well mixed.
4. Mix the brown sugar, cinnamon, cloves, mace, cardamom and salt. Add to the egg mixture and beat until well mixed.
5. Add the melted butter slowly and beat until well mixed.
6. Add graham flour slowly, then add all-purpose flour until the mixture is solid enough to knead.
7. Transfer to your work surface and knead in more all-purpose flour to make a soft, slightly sticky dough.
9. Roll and form the dough according to the directions for your cookie mold.
10. Chill the cookies while you preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit (177 degrees Celsius).
11. Bake for 10-15 minutes or until slightly browned at the edges.

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Tip: Removing Extra Flour from Molded Cookies

Some doughs just want to stick to your molds. One way to get around this is to brush flour fairly heavily on the dough surface before molding. "Fairly" heavily doesn't mean you have a whole layer of flour, but that you can see it clearly--it isn't just a whitish veil.

But if you do use extra flour, what's likely to happen is that you'll unmold the cookie and find that it's perfect except that there are some white spots on it. Don't panic.

The first thing to do is just set the cookie aside for about fifteen minutes at room temperature. Some or all of the flour is going to disappear. If any is left, you can remove it with a lightly oiled artist's brush, either before or after baking. If there's still quite a bit, try freezing the cookie solid and then removing the flour with a lightly oiled artist's brush.

And finally, you can use that same brush to remove flecks after baking.

Of course, this is for fairly minor cleanup--a cookie that has a few spots. If you have flour all over the cookie, you'll have to do it over.

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Tip: Buying Custom Made Molds

You might want a personalized mold, or one with a custom image, like the mouse above. A few cookie mold makers will make these, although the cost is several times that of a comparable ready-made mold. The makers I know of who do make custom molds are

HOBI Cookie Molds

My Cookie Mold

If you are another cookie mold maker who does provide this service, please use the contact form on this web page to let me know, and I'll add you to the list.

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Story: The Ropedancer

by Anne L. Watson

In a town not far from you, there lived a widow who fretted greatly about her only son. He was a handsome boy, with golden hair and a bright smile, and he was a good boy, too. He meant to be no trouble to his mother, but the two of them might have been from different countries, so unlike were they.

More

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Tip: Allover Pattern Rolling Pin

When you’re making layered cookies, you can’t re-roll the dough and keep the layers. So you want to get as many cookies as possible out of the first rolling. My favorite cookie mold for this is a springerle rolling pin with an allover pattern. Mine is antique, but House on the Hill has a similar one. Besides working so well for layered cookies, these are great for making a lot of molded cookies quickly.

 


A photo of mine is shown above.

And here’s the House on the Hill one—a little more structured than the pattern of mine, but I think it would work just as well.

 

.

When you’ve rolled your dough, and stacked the two layers, you flour the top lightly, make an allover design on it with one of these rolling pins, and then cut it into cookies, either with shaped cookie cutters (I use a fluted rectangle) or with a pastry wheel.

 

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Story—King o’ the Cats

Our storytelling evening stretches out with a spooky story, also from Aaron Shepard. This one is about a cat who…isn’t quite what he seems, and two men of the town of Tabby-on-Thames who learn that truth really can be stranger than fiction. Much stranger.

Click on the book cover to read the story on Aaron’s web site.

The story is from England, so we’ll have English tea cookies to go with it.

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Recipe: Chocolate Coconut Tea Cookies as Served in Tabby-on-Thames

 

The flavor is mostly like hot cocoa, with a more subtle coconut taste. For stronger chocolate flavor, make these as cookie tarts with a chocolate filling (see notes for filling suggestions), use the chocolate backing recipe from my book Baking with Cookie Molds, or make as a layered cookie with mini chocolate chips in the lower layer. If you add a chocolate backing, you could flavor it with coconut extract as well.

Although the dough is quite dark, the finished cookies are about the color of cocoa, which means that the details of your molds won't be lost.

1⁄2 cup (115 grams) unsalted butter
1 large egg
1 cup (235 milliliters) canned cream of coconut (See notes.)
1 tablespoon coconut extract
1 teaspoon chocolate extract
1⁄2 teaspoon vanilla
1⁄2 cup (100 grams) sugar
2 tablespoons cocoa
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1⁄4 teaspoon salt
About 4 1⁄2 cups (630 grams) all-purpose flour (plain flour)

1. Melt the butter and set aside.
2. Beat the egg in a large bowl until yolk and white are fully mixed.
3. Mix the cream of coconut, coconut extract, chocolate extract, and vanilla extract. Add to the egg and beat until well mixed.
4. Mix the sugar, cocoa, cinnamon, and salt. Add to the egg mixture and beat until well mixed.
5. Add the melted butter slowly and beat until well mixed.
6. Add flour slowly until the mixture is solid enough to knead.
7. Transfer to your work surface and knead in more flour to make a soft, slightly sticky dough.
8. Wrap or cover the dough and refrigerate for up to 1⁄2 hour—until it’s firm but still flexible.
9. Roll and form the dough
10. Refrigerate the cookies while you preheat the oven to 350°F (175°C), or lower for especially thick cookies.
11. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes or until the edges have slightly browned and the top has begun to firm up.
Notes
Cream of coconut is a sweetened mixture used in drinks and desserts. It is not to be confused with coconut cream, which is unsweetened. Like natural peanut butter, cream of coconut tends to separate, so stir to blend well before measuring.

Filling suggestions for cookie tarts: Chocolate buttercream frosting or chocolate almond butter.

 

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Story—The Sea King’s Daughter

 

This is a fine story for the finale of our evening around the fire—it’s a story about venturing out and coming home. Sadko, a musician is summoned to play for the Sea King. The king rewards him richly—but what will Sadko’s adventure cost him? Read Aaron Shepard’s story to find the answer.

Click on the book cover to read the story on Aaron’s web site.

 

 

 

 

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Recipe: Pryaniki for the Sea King’s Feast
(Plum Gingerbread Tarts)

1 cup butter
1 egg
1/2 cup honey
1 tablespoon cream
1/2 teaspoon natural lemon flavor
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger root
1/4 cup (50 grams) granulated sugar
1/4 cup (55 grams) brown sugar
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon.
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
1/8 teaspoon salt
About 4 1/2 cups (630 grams) all-purpose flour (plain flour)

1. Melt the butter and set aside.
2. Beat the egg in a large bowl until yolk and white are fully mixed.
3. Mix the honey, cream, lemon flavoring, vanilla extract, and grated ginger root. Add to the egg and beat until well mixed.
4. Mix the granulated sugar, brown sugar, ground ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, and salt. Add to the egg mixture and beat until well mixed.
5. Add the melted butter slowly and beat until well mixed.
6. Add flour slowly until the mixture is solid enough to knead.
7. Transfer to your work surface and knead in more flour to make a soft, slightly sticky dough.
8. Wrap or cover the dough and refrigerate for up to 1⁄2 hour— until it’s firm but still flexible.
9. Roll and form the dough according to the directions for cookie tarts.
10. Refrigerate the cookies while you preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175oC), or lower for especially thick cookies.
11. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes or until the edges have slightly browned and the top has begun to firm up.

Filling: A traditional filling for Pryaniki would be plum jam. If you like, mix the jam with cream cheese, plum liqueur, cinnamon, or lemon flavoring. Or all four.

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Recipe: Cookies for a January Birthday (Lime Cookies)

My birthday is in January, and my favorite flavor is any fruit flavor. When I was a child, my mother worked out a lime cake for my birthday, since most other fruits weren’t available in midwinter. Here’s a cookie that recreates the flavor. I like it best as either a cookie tart or a sandwich cookie with lime curd filling. I've used several different lime flavors here: culinary lime oil and powder as well as the more easily available juice and rind. If you want, you may increase the juice and rind amounts and omit the oil and powder.

1 cup (225 grams) unsalted butter
1 large egg
1⁄2 cup (120 milliliters) honey
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice
1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 teaspoon natural lemon flavoring
1/8 teaspoon natural lime oil
1⁄2 cup (100 grams) sugar
2 teaspoons finely grated lime peel
1 teaspoon finely grated lemon peel
1⁄8 teaspoon salt
About 4 1⁄2 cups (630 grams) all-purpose flour (plain flour)

1. Melt the butter and set aside.
2. Beat the egg in a large bowl until the yolk and white are fully mixed.
3. Mix the honey, lime juice, lemon juice, lemon flavoring, and lime oil. Add to the egg and beat until well mixed.
4. Mix the sugar, lime peel, lemon peel, and salt. Add to the egg mixture and beat until well mixed. If the mixture isn’t smooth, don’t worry—it will become smooth as you add the flour.
5. Add the melted butter slowly and beat until well mixed. Don’t just pour it in quickly—the heat still in the butter could cook the egg!
6. Add flour slowly and mix in until you have dough that is solid enough to knead.
7. Transfer the dough to a floured work surface. Continue adding flour by kneading in a little at a time until the dough is smooth and slightly sticky.
8. Wrap or cover the dough to prevent drying, then refrigerate to make it less sticky. This should take half an hour at most.
9. Roll and form the dough according to the directions for your cookie mold.
10. Refrigerate the cookies while you preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175oC).
11. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes or until the edges have slightly browned and the top has begun to firm up.

 

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Tip: Making Irregular-Shaped Cookies as Sandwich Cookies

Sandwich cookies are easy if your cookie mold is round or square, or if it comes with its own cutter, as a few do. But what do you do if you want to make a sandwich cookie with an irregular-shaped mold?

Easy—Bake one cookie from your mold. Lay it on a sheet of parchment paper or thin plastic, and trace around it with a pencil.

Cut about 1/16" inside the line. The cookie will expand a tiny bit as it bakes, so you want your pattern to be very slightly smaller than the cookie.

Now you have a template.

Using a sheet of nonstick foil for backing, roll out the dough you want to use for the bottom layer of the cookie. Chill it thoroughly and, using your template, cut out each cookie back with a sharp knife such as a craft knife. Remove the scraps and bake the cookie back as a test cookie to make sure the size is right.

Correct if necessary, and cut and bake enough cookie backs to make sandwiches with your molded cookies. You can trim the cookie backs slightly while they're still warm, if needed to fit the tops.

Just before serving, assemble the backs and tops with a filling.

 
 

 

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January Cookie Molds

 

Tart mold by Brown Cookie

 

 

Cookie mold hand carved by Jan Vande Voorde

 

 

 

Crown cookie mold by House on the Hill

 

 

Cat cookie mold by HOBI Cookie Molds

 

 

 

Small Wedding Coach by The Springerle Baker

 

 

 

Mouse cookie mold custom made by My Cookie Mold

 

Meadowlark Mold by Brown Bag Cookie Molds

 

 

 

Old cast iron bird cookie mold, maker unknown

 

 

 

Sleepy Cat cookie mold by Brown Bag Molds

 

 

Country Church cookie mold by House on the Hill

 

 

 

Antique Dutch ship cookie mold

 

 

 

Seahorse cookie mold by My Cookie Mold

 

 

 

Shell cookie mold by cherrycookiemolds.com

 

Birthday Cookie Tile by Brown Bag Molds


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Questions? Use the contact form for this web site.

 


Coming in February

Valentine Hearts, Flowers, and Chocolates
Recipe: Milk Chocolate Cherry Cookie Tarts
Tip: Using Found Objects to Mold Cookies
Recipe: Dark Chocolate Cookies with Marzipan Topping
Tip: Working with Marzipan
Recipe: Cinnamon-Cocoa Molded Cookies
Tip: More about Trimming Cookies
Recipe: I Love You Cookies
Tip: Texture and Molded Cookies
Recipe: Chocolate-Orange Valentines
Tip: Preparing Cookie Molds

 

 


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